I would clear away every slovenly obscurity I could and labour to make myself as clear as my plain meaning could be carried

"Yes, indeed. A very big element of that obscurity which is one of the mysteries and one of the glories of poetry, because labour as we may and labour as we must we can't tell really from whence it comes, and this is why I have always honoured the noble obscurity of poetry and deprecated the slovenly obscurity: I would clear away every slovenly obscurity I could and labour to make myself as clear as my plain meaning could be carried in order that the noble obscurities, if they come, may have their full weight and value. Because even in scraps and crumbs of poetry, in bits of old ballads, bits of ballads that Shakespeare embeds for instance--they make one's flesh creep with this mystery which is as much of the flesh as the spirit I think: 'Childe Rowland to the dark tower came"--he felt it too or he wouldn't have so embedded them into his text. And such phrases as 'How should I your true love know?' beyond their content, their plain meaning, there are depths of mystery, of obscurity if you like, and this is one of the major characteristics of poetry, one of its great raison d'etres and something we should be thankful for when it comes, and which we should labour to make clear and not to let anything slovenly through, so the thing itself, when it suddenly appears, may be seen to appear."

- Ruth Pitter